Posts

Showing posts from November, 2009

Australian Redback Spider Bites Rise in Osaka, Anti-Venom Low

By Adam Le Nov. 25 (Bloomberg) -- Redback spider bites increased to 13 in western Japan’s Osaka Prefecture this year, the most since 1995, when the poisonous arachnid was first thought to have migrated from Australia on cargo vessels. The number of reported cases increased from nine last year, according to the prefectural government’s Web site. In June, a six-year-old boy in Osaka was given the anti-venom after being bitten, the first case of the treatment being used in Japan. “We have low reserves of the anti-venom,” Takashi Kuramochi, a spokesman for the prefecture’s Environmental Hygiene Department, said today by telephone. “I don’t know why the number of redback bites is up.” The redback, common in Australia and related to the black widow, delivers a bite that can cause severe pain and possibly death, according to the Australia Museum’s Web site. No deaths from the spider’s bite have been reported after Australia introduced anti-venom, the Web site says. Called

Japanese researchers film rare baby fish 'fossil'

Image
Tue Nov 17, 6:39 am ET TOKYO (AFP) – Japanese marine researchers said on Tuesday they had found and successfully filmed a young coelacanth -- a rare type of fish known as "a living fossil" -- in deep water off Indonesia. The creature was found on October 6 at a depth of 161 metres (528 feet) in Manado Bay off Sulawesi Island, where the Indonesian coelacanth was first discovered, according to the researchers. Video footage showed the 31.5 centimetre (12.6-inch) coelacanth, coloured blue with white spots, swimming slowly among rocks on the seabed for about 20 minutes. "As far as we know, it was the first ever video image of a living juvenile coelacanth, which is still shrouded in mystery," said Masamitsu Iwata, a researcher at Aquamarine Fukushima in Iwaki, northeast of Tokyo. Scientists hope the discovery will shed light on the habitat and breeding habits of coelacanths. The researchers used a remotely operated, self-propelled vehicle to film

Jellyfish swarm northward in warming world

Image
By MICHAEL CASEY, AP Environmental Writer Michael Casey, Ap Environmental Writer Mon Nov 16, 8:37 am ET KOKONOGI, Japan – A blood-orange blob the size of a small refrigerator emerged from the dark waters, its venomous tentacles trapped in a fishing net. Within minutes, hundreds more were being hauled up, a pulsating mass crowding out the catch of mackerel and sea bass. The fishermen leaned into the nets, grunting and grumbling as they tossed the translucent jellyfish back into the bay, giants weighing up to 200 kilograms (450 pounds), marine invaders that are putting the men's livelihoods at risk. The venom of the Nomura, the world's largest jellyfish, a creature up to 2 meters (6 feet) in diameter, can ruin a whole day's catch by tainting or killing fish stung when ensnared with them in the maze of nets here in northwest Japan's Wakasa Bay. "Some fishermen have just stopped fishing," said Taiichiro Hamano, 67. "When you pull in the ne

Japan catches 59 whales off northern island

TOKYO – Japan said Monday it has caught 59 whales — one short of the maximum allowed by international guidelines — under a research program that critics say is a cover for commercial whaling. The annual expedition off the port city of Kushiro ended over the weekend after harvesting 59 minke whales, the Fisheries Agency said in a statement. A maximum of 60 is allowed under the research program authorized by the International Whaling Commission. Japan and other pro-whaling nations have been pushing for the IWC to revoke the 1986 ban on commercial hunts amid arguments over the number of whales left in the world's oceans. Japan also annually hunts about 1,000 whales in the Antarctic Ocean and the northwest Pacific Ocean under an IWC research program. Critics say the expeditions are a cover for commercial whaling because the harvest is sold to market for consumption. As in previous years, the Fisheries Agency said the hunt off Hokkaido was aimed at studying the whale

'I hate whale meat,' Japan's PM confides: report

Image
TOKYO (AFP) – Japan's Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama has revealed he dislikes whale meat, a newspaper reported Saturday, in an unusual confession for the prime minister of a country that defies Western criticism of whaling. "I hate whale meat," Hatoyama said during a meeting with his visiting Dutch counterpart Jan Peter Balkenende on Monday at the prime minister's office, the Sankei Shimbun reported. The Netherlands is one of several anti-whaling countries that allows the radical environmental group Sea Shepherd Conservation Society to register a vessel in the country. The group's activists have repeatedly harassed Japanese whaling vessels in Antarctic waters. During the last hunt a Sea Shepherd vessel collided with a whaling ship, sparking allegations that the group was behaving irresponsibly. Despite Hatoyama's reported dislike of whale meat, however, he urged Balkenende to take action against the group over its attacks on Japanese whalers in the Antarct

Double Nemo

Image
Double Nemo , originally uploaded by Lord Ivan .

jaws 3

Image
jaws 3 , originally uploaded by lomokev .

Gatto Gnau -bestia mai vista!...-

Image
Gatto Gnau -bestia mai vista!...- , originally uploaded by Gatto Gnau .

aquarium fish 水族館 魚

Image
aquarium fish 水族館 魚 , originally uploaded by nextaction-Aki .

aquarium fish 水族館 魚

Image
aquarium fish 水族館 魚 , originally uploaded by nextaction-Aki .

魚鴨爭艷

Image
魚鴨爭艷 , originally uploaded by gp_teo .